Saturday, September 24, 2016

Red Car Property: Fence

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 23, 2016.  Yes, there's a fence across the Red Car Property.  And yes, the homeless guy still lives in the white truck parked in front of the fence on the Red Car Property.  Look, they left us a path to walk around on the upslope side of the fenced area.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)

I've been inquiring as to what the heck is going on.  The fence was put up by the developer of the Riverside Drive lots.   I'm delaying posting news until I've verified information.  The more facts come in; the more questions come up.   So for right now you're getting photos.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 23, 2016.  Thanks to our ever vigilant neighbors, this is the most documented fence ever. Keep up the good work!  

Please send Red Car Property photos and any wildlife photos taken in the neighborhood if there is any wildlife left: redcarproperty@gmail.com.  I'll be posting photos and lengthy news here on the blog.  Photos (not always the same) and alerts are posted to our Twitter feed as they come in: @RedCarProperty

Please remember, I don't get paid to do this.   The Red Car Property is my albatross.
 

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Riverside Drive: Grading Project Leaves 1 Black Walnut Tree On Adjacent Red Car Property

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 18, 2016.   The developer for the 8 (or 13) Riverside Drive lots below the Red Car Property left one protected Black Walnut Tree on the Red Car Property when they were grading well beyond the property line, right up to and around the large protected Coast Live Oak Tree.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Diane Edwardson, June 6, 2016.  Earlier this summer, neither the Red Car Property nor the Riverside Drive lot owner had done brush clearance by May 1, like responsible hillside property owners.  Little did we know, every tree in this shot, despite their protected status, would be gone by mid-August.

Worth noting in the second photo, according to the Riverside Drive developer's property line stakes that had been in the ground and updated several times in the past few years, the dead Eucalyptus is on the Red Car Property.  The Coast Live Oak is the dark green tree in the upper right corner, is also on the Red Car Property.  Almost all the other bright green trees are California Black Walnuts that had grown back after earlier removals without permits. 

As I've said before, the City's Protected Native Tree Ordinance is a joke.  The point of protecting specific native species is because they are integral to the hillside habitat.  Razing and entire ecosystem, building on almost every inch of available hillside lot and planting a couple of 15 gallon trees in a graded slope, hoping they'll grow really isn't responsible urban forest management. 

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Red Car Property: Becoming Less Park-Like Every Day

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 17, 2016.  The developer of 13 lots on Riverside Drive left not only a denuded hillside, grading and further taking out trees on the downslope side of the Red Car Property, but also deposited a giant tree stump pulled out of the ground and left on the Red Car Property.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 17, 2016.  Earlier in the day, neighbors sounded the alarm when the backhoe was digging right up against the protected Coast Live Oak Tree's trunk.  The Red Car Property line is 20 - 30 feet downslope from the flat part of the Red Car Property.  Clearly,  the Riverside Drive developer moved earth around, well beyond the rear property of the Riverside Drive lots.  

By the end of the day Saturday, concrete posts (reinforced with rebar) that marked the property lines since the dawn of the Big Red Car Trolleys (1905) had disappeared.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 17, 2016.  Looking in the opposite direction from the oak tree, things are even more bleak.  We'll take a closer look at those trees in coming days.   Here too, the property line is 20 to 30 feet downslope. But the slope has been changed significantly so who knows where the line is anymore.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Riverside Drive: Neighbors Question Grading Project As It Crosses Onto Red Car Property

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 17, 2016.  Saturday morning, neighbors let me know the developer of the Riverside Drive lots (between Gilroy and Clearwater) was moving earth perilously close to the Protected Coast Live Oak Tree. The Coast Live Oak is on the Red Car Property. Checking the Building & Safety website, I saw no grading permits issued for either of the two adjacent Red Car Property lots.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)

The Red Car Property line is about 20 to 30 feet downslope from the flat part of the Red Car Property as well as the oak tree.  In the photo above, the backhoe is working on the edge of the flat part. So the Riverside Drive developer was definitely moving earth around the Red Car Property.

The ancient concrete post property line markers, in place since at least the dawn of the Big Red Car Trolleys, marked the rear property line of the Riverside Drive Lots where they back into the Red Car Property. They're about 3' tall and 4" square.  Whenever these lots have been surveyed, the new property line markers line up with the concrete property marker posts.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, August 27, 2016.  Last month, neighbors were alarmed when a developer began clear cutting trees on 13 vacant lots on Riverside Drive adjacent to the Red Car Property.  

The most consistent comment I'm hearing from neighbors about the Riverside Drive/Gilroy development is, "How is it possible they didn't need approval from the City [Planning] for this?"  I'd like to know that too.  It appears that by submitting applications for building permits for each of 8 lots separately, they seem to have snuck in under the radar for hillside grading and retaining walls.  (There seems to be a question of lot ties and parcel map cases because there are actually 13 legal substandard lots they're using for 14 units, but they only submitted 8 or 9 lots, and I'm not seeing lot ties.)

If you've ever lived near a construction site - you know there are environmental impacts like the constant vibration during grading.  I wonder how much damage the hundred year old homes next door will incur on this not so stable slope.

With no discretionary actions by City Planning (i.e., size of retaining walls, height, setback, parking, yard variances) there was no public review.  Thus, the protected native tree removal permits were issued in August this year, prior to granting grading and retaining wall permits. (It's not clear if grading permits have been issued on all the lots yet.)  

In practice, granting protected tree removal permits prior to issuing grading and retaining wall permits is just poor urban forest management.  Grading is the single most important decision that dictates how things are designed and built on hillside lots.  So often, we see lots sit denuded of trees for decades, before someone comes along willing to throw enough money at it to build it.  Even then, it doesn't always get built.  That is one reason the City's Protected Native Tree Ordinance was favored by environmental and neighborhood groups.
Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 24, 2016. Earlier this year, neighbors were happy seeing many of the protected California Black Walnut Trees growing back after the last tree carnage in 2014When you live so close to a freeway, EVERY TREE MATTERS.

It appears the City, in its rush to streamline the building permitting process, is ignoring the fact that Hillside development is not always urban infill (redevelopment).  This is greenfield development (lots in a natural state supporting wildlife) that actually attach to a known wildlife corridor (the Red Car Property).  There was a thriving protected native tree habitat on the 13 lots before the developer began cutting down trees without permits (apparently without much of a penalty) 2 years ago.

Clearly this 8/13 lot project is one project, involving a lot of grading between the already built lots on Riverside Drive. 

Related: Silver Lake Neighborhood Council Wants To Clean Up Riverside Drive (Yes, you should always ask "Why and who is sponsoring it?")

Saturday, September 17, 2016

Riverside Drive: Grading Project Endangers Coast Live Oak On Red Car Property

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor September 17, 2016.  A backhoe was digging and pushing earth around, right up against the huge and healthy protected Coast Live Oak Tree on the Red Car Property this morning. (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor September 17, 2016.Within minutes of sending photos to the Red Car Property owner's rep, he responded saying they called the developer who said "they didn't touch the tree."  A Red Car Property rep was en route to the scene.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 17, 2016.  The property line is about 20 to 30' downslope from the Coast Live Oak Tree.  The oak tree is on the Red Car Property.  It is one of the few protected native trees left on this portion of the  Red Car Property.  The Riverside Drive developer cut down the protected black walnuts on the Red Car Property without permits. 

He had permits to cut down protected native trees on Riverside Drive lots, not on Red Car Property lots.

Friday, September 16, 2016

2 Freeway: Landscape Project? Do We Dare Hope For Trees?

Photo: Gary Vlahakis, September 14, 2016.  CalTrans installed a solar panel to power their irrigation project they've been working below the log cabins on Corralitas Drive.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Gary Vlahakis, August 30, 2016.  Neighbors were wondering why CalTrans was digging loudly around the one Coast Live Oak Tree on the Corralitas side of the 2 Freeway for the past few weeks.  Vlahakis noticed that is was an irrigation project. 

Neighbors hope it means CalTrans will be planting trees on the 2 Freeway.  I wouldn't hold my breath.  Back in the early 1990s, CalTrans cut down all but 3 trees north/east of Rosebud on the Corralitas side of the 2 Freeway for an earlier "irrigation project."  In the 1990s, pleas to replace the trees to CalTrans fell on deaf ears. 

It was only after neighbors asked then Assembly Speaker Antonio Villaraigosa for help that CalTrans returned to plant some small shrubs instead of trees. What did we get?  Before Villaraigosa left the Assembly, we got mostly Peruvian Oleander, a pathetic yellow-flowering bush that never got much taller than 4'. Discussions with a CalTrans rep (shortly after the  Silver Lake Fire) indicated that's what they'd be planting again. 

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Red Car Property, Riverside Drive: Black Walnuts Made A Brief Comeback

Photo: Diane Edwardson, June 6, 2016.  The protected native Black Walnut Trees that were mostly chopped down a year earlier, had staged a comeback by summer 2016.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Diane Edwardson, September 9, 2015.  A year ago, after brush clearance on both the Red Car Property and the 13 Riverside Lots below, the future was not looking so good for the protected native Black Walnuts.  The trees suffered through years of drought, combined with overzealous or perhaps intentional butchering of the new growth around the old stumps of the Black Walnut Trees butchered in 2014.  And yet the Red Car Property owner could not bother to take down the dead Eucalyptus that had been alive in summer 2013.  The Eucalyptus, Coast Live Oak and everything upslope from the property line marker, is on the Red Car Property.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Red Car Property, Riverside Drive: Protected Native Trees In 2014

Photo: Diane Edwardson, August 17, 2014. Days before the first round of tree carnage in August 2014, the Riverside Drive lots below the Red Car Property were pretty park like with dozens of protected California Black Walnut Trees.  (Click on photo to enlarge.)

Today, the large Coast Live Oak Tree (the large dark green tree on the right) is pretty much the only tree left in this shot.  The oak tree is on the Red Car property which extends 20 - 30' downslope. 

The Riverside Drive lots, roughly between Gilroy and Clearwater, were cleared of trees last month, are in various stages of plancheck, yet grading appears to have begun.

Thursday, September 8, 2016

Red Car Canyon: Jabba The Squirrel

Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 19, 2016.  There always seems to be at least one obese squirrel with a bad attitude living in Red Car Canyon. (Click on photo to enlarge.)

Jabba The Squirrel doesn't so much scamper through the densely forested section of the Red Car Property, as he lumbers through.  Before the Silver Lake Fire, I'd often see him lying on one of the branches of the now dead, non-native walnut tree.

Perhaps since the Silver Lake Fire and subsequent tree decimation on the south end of the property and the 2 Freeway, Jabba is more secretive in his whereabouts.  He would be a feast for the local Red Tailed Hawks.

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Red Car Property: Not A Park, Not A Road

Photo: Gary Vlahakis, August 30, 2016.  The Red Car Property is not a public road despite several mapping services identifying it as "Silver Lake Court."  Silver Lake Court does not extend this far.  It is a land locked paper street that has never been built, existing only on City maps, only connecting to two public staircases, Roselin and Silver Lake Ave.  Silver Lake Court does not intersect India Street.

Neighbors report trucks for the 13 Riverside Drive lots currently being graded (off camera to the right), were driving on and off the Red Car Property last week.  If you live off the Red Car Property, on Riverside, Adelbert or India St (east of the Red Car Property) and are seeing a number of trucks using the Red Car Property for access to 2344-2424 Riverside Drive, report it to Building & Safety.  This is not an acceptable "haul route."

Worth noting in the lower right corner of the above photo: the blue bin of trash has been migrating around Lot C of the Red Car Property for quite some time.

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Red Car Property: Not A Park, Not A Road, Protected Native Trees Are In Danger

Photo: Gary Vlahakis, August 30, 2016.  Many people don't know what an oak tree looks like.  (Click on photo to enlarge.)

There's a beautiful Coast Live Oak hanging on to the Red Car Property slope above the 13 lots that were just cleared of all trees on Riverside DriveThe Coast Live Oak Tree is near the border of Lot C and the next lot north on the the Red Car Property.

Neighbors report the arundo was cut down, in addition to a lot of tree trimming in this section of the Red Car Property over the holiday weekend.

The developer of the 13 Riverside Drive lots also cut down some trees on the Red Car Property.  The City did not issue permits to cut down protected native Coast Live Oaks nor California Black Walnuts on the Red Car Property.  The Red Car Property extends about 20 to 30' feet downslope toward Riverside Drive.

According to a review on the Building & Safety website, of the 13 lots on Riverside Drive - of the 8 lots with building permits pending - 6 have permits to remove protected native trees.  There were no discretionary actions by City Planning involved.  I don't know if additional homes are planned or if, because they are substandard lots, lots are being combined to build larger homes. 

There is no public review when there are no discretionary actions by City Planning.  Discretionary actions include, but are not limited to, zone changes; subdivisions; condo conversions; parking, height and yard variances.  The City has been streamlining the building and city planning process, making it easier for developers to build faster, involving less public review and creating more impact on the native habitat and neighbors in both short and long term.

Friday, September 2, 2016

Riverside Drive: You Never Know What's Under There Until You Start Digging

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, September 1, 2016.  Wonder if they'll find the 8' diameter concrete conduit a former Riverside Drive resident used for target practice of military grade automatic weapons, as recently as the mid-1990s, before he got busted.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 24, 2016.  Until a few weeks ago, the lots looked more like this.  The graffiti wall hiding behind the now since removed protected native California Black Walnut, but is visible behind the no parking sign in the first photo above. 

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Red Car Property: Red Shouldered Hawks
Why Trees Matter

Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 21, 2016. As I walked south on the Red Car Property from the historic landmark viaduct footings, I heard the telltale sound of a mockingbird harassing a predator.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)  

If you want to see more hawks, learn the pissed off calls of mockingbirds.  This one chased a Red Shouldered Hawk to a branch high in a tree on Lot C of the Red Car Property.  I watched as the mockingbird dive bombed the hawk and hopped from branch to branch of a tree that had not resprouted leaves this spring.  The little bird was fearless and relentless in its noisy display.
Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 21, 2016.  While the mockingbird focused the bulk of its energy on the hawk near the top of the tree, it kept diving into the dense branches at the center of this clump of trees.  At this time of year, that could mean a recently fledged hawk was hanging around in the relative safety of the trees.  

If you walk the Red Car Property regularly, you know how narrow this trail passageway is.  I didn't see the second hawk until I was within 10' of the trees. The bright backlighting worked in the hawk's favor, as the feathers on its back and wings look like dappled light coming through the leaves.
Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 21, 2016.  I felt privileged to witness a Red Shouldered Hawk so close, at eye level.  Both hawks kept an eye on me and my on-leash dog as I snapped photos blindly, hoping to catch a good shot.  Sadly, this was the best I could do. 

I don't know if it was a mated pair or one or two recently fledged Red Shouldered Hawks. In the past few years, we've documented Red Shouldered Hawks on the north end of the Red Car Property almost exclusively.

The north end of the Red Car Property is Red Shouldered Hawk territory, most likely because it is the closest urban forested area to the LA River in our neighborhood. Unfortunately, with such a large swath of trees clear cut from the adjacent Riverside Drive lots, as well as a portion of the Red Car Property, it remains to be seen if Red Shouldered Hawks will continue calling the Red Car Property home.

Learn more about Red Shouldered Hawks: Cornell University's All About Birds

Most of the time, we've seen Red Shouldered Hawks in California Black Walnut trees.  
Click here for all our Red Shouldered Hawk posts. 

Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Red Car Property: Beautiful Decay

Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 25, 2016.  Yes, we're tired of all the dead tree, fire and tree removal posts too. Find some beauty in the dead, non-native wild radish plants on the north end of the property.  (Click on photo to enlarge.)

Monday, August 29, 2016

Riverside Drive: More Trees Cut Down Saturday

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor #1, August 29, 2016.  Saturday, more large trees including at least one Protected Native Black Walnut Tree and a "significant" sized Eucalyptus were removed along with other trees from yet another lot on Riverside Drive.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)

It's hard to tell the addresses when there are a total of 13 substandard vacant lots adjacent to the Red Car Property here. More than one Black Walnut Tree has been removed since August 15.   A "significant" tree has no protected status, but usually require replacement on a 1:1 basis with a tree that won't reach that size again in our lifetimes.  Yet, without a discretionary action by City Planning, there is no public review and no accountability.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor #2, August 26, 2016.  Last Friday, the developer tore down the much beloved local landmark, the curvy stairs on Riverside Drive and cut into the hillside on a number of lots with a backhoe, despite only having grading permits in hand for 1 of the 13 vacant lots (and not the one with the curvy stairs.)

Also worth noting is the ancient concrete property line marker that marks the rear lot line adjacent to the Red Car Property.  (We'll address property line markers and brush clearance in upcoming posts.)
Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 24, 2016.  It's hard to tell, but the wall with graffiti on it, is hidden behind the Black Walnut Tree.  

Also worth noting are the low, green "bushes."  Those are not bushes, but protected native Black Walnut Trees that were cut down 2 years ago without permits. They have been regenerating as native trees in the right habitat will do.  We addressed this in the past as well as after the Silver Lake Fire and will address this again as we have extensive archives.

In my experience, if they're cutting down trees on a Saturday, they likely don't have a permits to remove the protected native trees.  This lot does not appear to have the same address as the lot which received a permit to remove one protected native Black Walnut Tree.

Friday, August 26, 2016

2 Freeway: What Difference Do Trees Make? Part 2

Photo: Diane Edwardson, July 18, 2009.  The scale of the loss of trees on the 2 Freeway adjacent Corralitas Drive is only evident when people are in the photos with trees.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)

It's hard to imagine the southbound lanes of the 2 Freeway are about 15' away from the urban hikers of The Big Parade 2009 on Corralitas Walk.
Photo: Lupita Chapa, August 5, 2016.  A month after the Silver  Lake Fire, CalTrans began removing the 50+ year old enormous Eucalyptus and Brazilian Pepper Trees (that for the 26 years I've lived on Corralitas Drive) have formed a 30-40' tall green barrier between Corralitas and the Southbound lanes of 2 Freeway.

Don't expect to see new trees planted here. CalTrans is under water restrictions imposed by Governor Brown.  If we're lucky, we might get some ground cover to help prevent erosion.  I've spoken to two CalTrans representatives who have told me, on multiple occasions - even before the Silver Lake Fire, trees planted on freeway parkways do not clean the air, control dust, mitigate sound, provide psychological benefits or provide a safety barrier.  I guess trees lose their ability to do those things when they're planted on freeways. 

Yes trees planted today won't mitigate much right now.  However, that is no reason to ignore the long term effects of tree planting.

Earlier this year Doug Brown, Senior Landscape Architect for CalTrans was quoted in a Scientific American story, "When managed properly, trees are proven cost-effective mitigation measures that sequester carbon.”  (Sequestering carbon is how trees remove pollutants from the air and store it underground.) 
Photo: Lupita Chapa, August 5, 2016.  As far as public safety goes, there is only about 50 feet of guard rail near the freeway signs that cross the freeway, which are north of where the cars usually fly off the freeway  - to be stopped by the large (now removed) Eucalyptus.

CalTrans is concerned about the safety of drivers, not the safety of those who have chosen to live next to a freeway because it was affordable.  Until the Silver Lake Fire, and CalTrans' subsequent removal of trees their landscape experts deemed necessary, trees made living across the narrow street from the freeway tolerable.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

2 Freeway: CalTrans Picked Up Trash

Photo: Corralitas Neighbor, August 25, 2016.  A CalTrans crew picked up trash the CalTrans crew of tree trimmers left behind last week.  The neighbor said in a text "There were CalTrans people all over the bottom of the hill, along the highway and under the bridge [Rosebud] cleaning and working when I left this morning. "
Photo: Diane Edwardson, June 20, 2016.  Remarkably, the Silver Lake Fire, which burned most of the 2 Freeway parkways between the Red Car Property and Riverside Drive, did not burn this part of the parkway from Rosebud & Allesandro to Riverside Drive where the Brazillian Pepper Trees were a pretty solid wall of green.  Neighbors were sad to see the green go last week.  CalTrans left the first enormous Eucalyptus in this shot, the same tree is still standing in the first photo.  It is the tree where the Red Tailed Hawks have a nest near the top third of the tree.  The hawks returned with fledglings to the nest on the night of the fire. 
 

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Corralitas Drive: Feeling Exposed

Photo: Gary Vlahakis, July 26, 2016.  Neighbors on the short end of Corralitas Drive are feeling awfully exposed to the 2 Freeway since CalTrans cut down trees in the past month.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)

With only about 50' of guard rail near the freeway signs (in the above photo), neighbors don't want to let their kids play out in the street after CalTrans cut down trees since the Silver Lake Fire.  Neighbors directly across the street from the southbound lanes of the 2 Freeway, are asking for a sound wall and trees.  The 50+ year old Eucalyptus trees (the pile of trees in the above photo) did prevent more than one car from flying off the southbound lanes of the 2 Freeway in 2015.
Photo: Gary Vlahakis, August 10, 2016Corralitas Drive south of the Rosebud Overpass on the 2 Freeway used to have a lush stand of trees to block the view of the freeway.  Now, living next to the 2 Freeway is louder, dirtier and less safe.  

Last month, a CalTrans representative told me the vegetation along our portion of the 2 Freeway was originally planted for erosion control on the steep slope.  He said trees on the freeway do not block sound, clean the air nor serve a safety purpose.

Worth noting in both of these photos is the scale of the cut wood, trees and retaining walls in relationship with the workers, heavy equipment and trucks.  There are only 8 houses on this part of Corralitas Drive.  Six homes lost a bucolic view when the freeway was built in 1960.  (Two homes were built in the last decade.) 

CBS Los Angeles posted a collection of photos from the Silver Lake Fire by photographer Matt Hartman, Shorealone Films.  The photos primarily show the 2 Freeway on fire.
 

Monday, August 22, 2016

2 Freeway: What Difference Do Trees Make?

Photo: Diane Edwardson, May 20, 2012.  More than 100 people appreciated the shade of the trees on the southbound 2 Freeway parkway as they took  Corralitas Walk from Allesandro Way to the Corralitas Red Car Property on Day 2 of The Big Parade 2012.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Lupita Chapa, August 5, 2016.  Six weeks after the Silver Lake Fire, a clump of 3 big trees and a smattering of smaller trees will not provide much shade now.  In the past month, CalTrans has removed trees on the 2 Freeway to further reduce the fire danger.  

The Eucalyptus on the Red Car Property slope has sprouted new growth near the trunk and larger branches, but should be trimmed back to reduce further fire danger.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Riverside Drive: Chopped

Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, August 15, 2016.  Last week, a large crew clear cut all of the trees and brush on a number of vacant lots on Riverside Drive between Gilroy and Fletcher. This is well beyond brush clearance.  (Click on photos to enlarge.)
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, August 15, 2016.  A large crew worked quickly,   removing all evidence of all the protected native Black Walnuts as well as all the other trees on what appears to be 8 or 9 vacant lots.  Most of these lots are the same lots where the property owner cut down more than 15 protected native trees without permits in August 2014.  

We don't know if the property owner was fined for the 2014 tree removal.  These lots were a testament to the hardiness of California Black Walnuts, as many of the larger trees cut down in 2014 were growing back.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, August 15, 2016.  According to CD13, the developer secured a permit from the City's Department of Urban Forestry to remove 1 protected native Black Walnut Tree.  Dozens of Black Walnuts were cut down last Monday.  In addition to the numerous protected native trees of all sizes, they also removed an unknown number of significant trees (with a trunk diameter of 8" or more).  Those trees don't count.
Photo: Red Car Property Neighbor, August 15, 2016.  We've said it before.  The City's Protected Native Tree Ordinance doesn't do what it purports to do - protect our native hillside habitat by protecting specific native trees.  Instead, it just gives developers a formula for cutting down our native trees, which are becoming more scarce every day.